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Sunday, July 6, 2014

National Distaste

swiss people really don't like speaking high german, they prefer english

14 comments:

  1. Haha, so true! I'm Swiss and it really is a fact that we don't like to speak "High German" as we call it, even though we're fluent. I guess it's because it's not our native language and we think that the Germans look down on us (we're inferior to them)... And bc we're really proud of our Swiss dialect. And i think people rather speak English than German with a foreigner, haha...

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    1. It got to the point where I couldn't even get the Swiss to speak German with me at all. I'd speak to them in German and they'd speak to me in English!

      I guess that works...!

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    2. I think it might not be the German looking down on the Swiss, after all the Swiss are richer, but rather the Germans just can't understand Swiss German?

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  2. Just switch the flags and the last panel and this describes perfectly the situation for me, a Cypriot Greek speaker when he has to speak in Standard Greek.

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    1. [img]http://www.picresize.com/images/rsz_afnibn3.png[/img]

      Click to make full sized

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    2. Could you please upload it again? It can't be seen nor opened in a new tab :\

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    3. Whoops, sorry. Here you go.

      [img]http://mmrempen.com/MISC/26_cyprus_sm.png[/img]

      Click here to make full sized.

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    4. Thank you, I will keep it to show it to some friends :)

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  3. Is it that bad? What would a Seiss feel when speaking to a non-native German speaker? Would English still be preferrable, assuming the non-native German speaker can speaker both?

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    1. Well, we (Swiss German speaking People) can speak German fluently but we just don't like to speak it. I think a lot of us would actually prefer to speak English... it's just that we know that we have a strong Accent when we speak German and the Germans (not all of them obivously) make fun of us ("it sounds cute") because of that. I think it would depend on how good their English and your German is. Swiss German speaking peope usually try to make as easy as possible for the other Person. So if they are quite good at English and notice that you're struggling with speaking German, they would probably just Switch to English...

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  4. Cannot stop giggling at last panel. Hehehehehe.

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  5. You do know why High German is called High German, right? It's because the consonant shift which led to the origins of the language took place in the high areas of the German-speaking lands (i.e. the mountains): Bavaria, Switzerland... Tell that to a German, and they'll be looking at you as if you'd just killed a puppy in front of their eyes ;)

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    1. I did not know that. Interesting! I thought it was just a way of saying "general" German, as sort of the umbrella above the various dialects.

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    2. Consonant shift? You mean vowel shift.
      Yes Malachi, that is the way most Germans think of the term too. But Rogier is right in making the historical connection. What linguists call Hochdeutsch is a very large dialect group. The subcategories are Oberdeutsch, Mitteldeutsch and Fränkisch. What's-commonly-meant-by-Hochdeutsch seems to have most to do with the more northern represantatives of it, such as ostfränkisch (what non-linguists call fränkisch) or Luther's Thuringian. The German of the North of the South, rather mittelgebirgig than alpine.
      I understand that predominance of Hochdeutsch started with Mittelhochdeutsch, a mutated Swabian that spread as a supraregional artists language with the Minnesänger's poetry. Swabian is a breed of Oberdeutsch, so maybe you could say, with time the epicentre of standard German moved farther away from the alps. When that thuringian cleric locked himself up in a castle to do some translating that may have had some influence.

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