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Sunday, December 3, 2017

Hyvää Syntymäpäivää

Finnish 100 year birthday


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Miksi ei?



14 comments:

  1. Finland was first part of Sweden, then Russia. Our language has nothing to do with either of their languages. So we (Finland)got independence...

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    1. And... the second language is the English, right? That's really comics.

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    2. Generally, swedish is secondary (but truthfully only if academia or politics), on eastern border unofficially russia is 2nd language , and if on tech side english

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  2. This reminds me of why Rumantsch (Sursilvan) is Switzerland's fourth official language ^^;

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  3. I love these history comics

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  4. I don't really understand the story...

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    1. All the country part of other speak the same as language. For example in Brazil speak Portuguese, the country of suth America speak Spanish. And in case of Finland was part Sweden and Russia, but have your own language.

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    2. Thanks for the explaination, but fix your vocab and grammar a bit, would you?

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  5. Finland vs Russia (the Winter War) is a cool story, although I mostly only know enough about it to know that it's a cool story...

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    1. The Winter War happened after Finland's independence. This strip is about 1917, not 1937 (a "cool" year indeed).

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  6. Hahah, nice one! :D

    For anyone wondering, the translations:
    "Kokoo kokoon koko kokko!" = "Put together the whole bonfire!"
    "Koko kokkoko?" = "The whole bonfire?"
    "Koko kokko." = "The whole bonfire."

    "Ääliö älä lyö, ööliä läikkyy" = "Idiot don't hit, the beer will spill!"
    Here's the whole beaty of a song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQucAC12mg4

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    1. Wow, that just made it even funnier than I first thought. I'd imagined that all the "koko kokko" talk was like the English equivalent of "blah blah," but for Finnish. Thanks for sharing!

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