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Sunday, December 10, 2017

Hollywoodized

In Europe, 911 emergency number is 112


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For more foreign emergency services info-comics!


23 comments:

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    1. I think because of EU-rules, 112 have to work as emergency number even in the UK.

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    2. Well, I didn't know we could use that number. Still 999 as far as I'm concerned normally.

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    3. I think each country still has their own number (e.g. 999 in the UK, 100 in Belgium, etc). However, dialling 112 is encouraged these days because it will still work near or across borders (You know, mobile phone providers and everything).

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  2. t's not 112 in the UK. It might work, but that's _not_ the emergency number.

    When the World Trade Center attacks happened was when I learned -- at 33 years old -- that it wasn't 999 for the whole world. Having lived in 3 or 4 countries at that age, I had never known any other emergency number.

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    1. Thanks for the info! Changed it a bit. Better now I hope

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  3. Hahaha... Very funny.

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  4. Amusing story: 112 is actually a GSM standard, and also works in the US, from a GSM mobile.

    In Australia, the emergency number is 000.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/112_(emergency_telephone_number) :
    112 is a part of the GSM standard and all GSM-compatible telephone handsets are able to dial 112 even when locked or, in some countries, with no SIM card present. It is also the common emergency number in India and in nearly all member states of the European Union as well as several other countries of Europe and the world. 112 is often available alongside other numbers traditionally used in the given country to access emergency services. In some countries, calls to 112 are not connected directly but forwarded by the GSM network to local emergency numbers (e.g., 911 in North America or 000 in Australia).

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    1. And amusingly, in the Netherlands, 911 also redirects to 112. So, the comic isn't in the Netherlands ;-)

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  5. I’m from England, where good old 999 does the job. However, on an iPhone at least, if you phone 911 , 999 or 112 in Europe they’ll connect you to the emergency services. Also you can phone 122 , 133 or 144 for fire police or ambulance respectively. 2 looks like a fire hose, 3 like handcuffs and 4 like a stool(way to remember). Although I’ve i got this wrong once when wanting an ambulance and was told off by a very grumpy policeman. Personally I think 999 is the easiest to remember but that’s what I grew up with so that’s prob why.

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  6. Forgot to mention I’m in Austria now, not sure if the 122, 133, 144 is just austria or not

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    1. That's only for Austria. Germany has 110 (police) or 112 (firefighters/rescue).

      I also learned that the Porsche 911 was sold since 1963, whereas the emergency call number 911 was introduced 1968. So Porsche was first.

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  7. Although ironically 911 will work in the UK because so many people do watch American TV and forget 999 or are tourists.

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  8. Ps why 911? I think 999 was to make it hard to accidentally dial but 911? Anyone know?

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    1. I would think 999 would make it easier to dial it accidentally, as you could have something accidentally press the nine button, and it would be relatively easy to either hold it down, or hit it repeatedly as whatever it is jostles against the button. For 911, the buttons are on opposite corners of the keypad, thus it's much less likely to accidentally hit the correct sequence.

      The actual reason it's 911 is apparently due to something technical with how the switching system worked at the time it was chosen -- 999 wouldn't work in the US at the time. There are a whole series of N11 codes, such as 411 for local directory assistance, 611 for line repair issues, and 711 to be connected to the telecommunications relay service for the deaf (eg you speak to the operator and they connect to a TDD device used by the deaf person you're calling and the operator will relay what you are saying to them in written form -- likely that will be obsolete someday, when everyone carries a cell and/or land lines gain the ability to text....).

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    2. Remember, this was back int he days of rotary phones as well. Dialing "9" would take a second or two more to dial than the "1".

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  9. I don't know the emergency number but it's so funny amazing. i love it.

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  10. very good i did not know the emergence number of UK thanks again

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  11. thanks for this comic! I ended up searching about the emergency numbers of my country and ended up even learning about the Mercosul one

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  12. 112 works for some (most?) Americans. Might depend on your location / cell carrier though.

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  13. Remember http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7010749.stm ?

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