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Sunday, September 18, 2016

Ubiquitous Shape, Pt. 2

Circular bready foods from around the world: Injera from East Africa, Roti Prata from Singapore, Arepa from Colombia and Venezuela, cong iu bing from Taiwan, Lahmacun from Turkey, Manakish from Lebanon Middle East, Pfannkuchen from Germany


And check out part one here for more planar, oblique doughy edibles.

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If a series of circles doesn't count as great comic art,
then I don't know what does.

20 comments:

  1. Apparently, in Germany they have a ton of different names for pancake, depending on the region.

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    Replies
    1. Oh yes! I'd rather call it Eierkuchen, Pfannkuchen are something completely different. ;-)

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  2. In austra they are called 'Palatschinken"

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks! Not sure if a Part 3 of this comic is truly necessary, but if it does end up happening, you can believe Palatschinken will be in there.

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    2. Cool! I'm English but love in Austria, therefore I enjoy your take on linguistic funniness.

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  4. Actually, it's spelled Cōng Yóu Bǐng and is from both Taiwan and China

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    1. Is there a standardized spelling for phonetic writing of other languages? I always kind of figured there were multiple ways to spell it, depending on subtleties in pronunciation across regions. But that was totally my assumption.

      Basically what I'm asking is, can there really be a "right" way to spell Cōng Yóu Bǐng if not in the original Chinese?

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    2. Pinyin is pretty much considered the standard way of writing Chinese out phonetically, rendering the Wade-Giles system essentially obsolete. Taiwan has their own phonetic notation system (zhuyin/bopomofo), but it does not use letters from the Latin alphabet. For the case of 蔥油餅, the iú is definitely not standard in any Romanization system that I know of. No capitalization in this case is necessary, either - cōng yóu bǐng is fine :)

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    3. The other person is correct. Although Taiwan has its own phonetic system, it doesn't use the Latin alphabet. The standard Mandarin which is used in Taiwan, China and other Chinese speaking countries use PinYin, the official Latin alphabet pairing to Mandarin Chinese. Cōng yóu bǐng is the standard Latin alphabet pairing for 葱油饼 in mandarin. The other option is to use the Taiwanese alphabet pairing, which doesn't use the Latin Alphabet

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    4. See, this is why I love making Itchy Feet. I learn SO much from you guys. So I'll change it to cōng yóu bǐng and all should be well, right?

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    5. Fixed! Thanks again guys for the input.

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  5. 蔥抓(zhuā)餅 is roundish, too! Though 蔥油餅 is probably more well known.

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    Replies
    1. I've always though that 葱油饼 and 手抓饼 were kinda the same type of 饼, just with slightly different ingredients.

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    2. Which means that you could consider them as different 'types' of 餅 - just a question how fine you want the division to be really. :p

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  6. The characters have some thickness to their arms and legs! O.o

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    1. You noticed! Yes, I'm trying something new with the limbs - I also got rid of the space between panels a few comics back. We'll see how I like it, though...

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  7. For the part #3, we have a flatbread called "rieska" in Finland. Sweden and Norway have their own versions: Sweden's called tunnbröd (literally 'thin bread') and Norway's 'lefse'.

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