Put your email in the box, then comics will come to you!

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Customer Service

german customer service is crappy

17 comments:

  1. Ah! I remember these moments!
    Well captured!

    ReplyDelete
  2. To be fair: A German just wouldn't ask :p

    ReplyDelete
  3. As a German, I can confirm this. Customer service is not what it used to be, but then again, you find this phenomenon in many countries.

    ReplyDelete
  4. As a former expat who lived in Rheinland-Pfalz for several years, I can confirm this. Upon returning home (Australia) I was completely shocked when I walked into a shop and was greeted with "Hi. How are you? That's great! I'm great, too! Right... how can I help you? ...*he's taking some time here*... Can I recommend product X? my wife really likes this one... a lot of customers like this one... my personal favourite is this one... anything else you might be unsure about?"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. (German here) The funny thing is, I cant stand this smalltalk at all. We have in our city a Hollister-shop, where employees were trained to greet every customer with your said words! Every time I go inside, I feel completely uncomfortable... I dont know how I should respond here, because he as a strange person comes with an friendship-like attitude towards me. Neither you (as a german) cant say:"Hey buddy, how are you doing, bla bla bla ..." nor "Good day, sir!" Both would be inapropriate (for a german man). Also I feel disturbed, when I just want to lurk around.
      But back to topic: German's not the best Customer Service, but I'm pretty sure, if you want a recommendation, you will get one and mostly (depends on the salesman) a friendly one. Its just not that common, that you start a conversation there. Most Germans look for what to buy in the standing line for example and tell the decision the salesman. Its okay to ask for further information, but try to keep it short. I'll have to admit, that this is not the most friendly enviroment, but the most effective one.

      Delete
    2. Well, we certainly can't fault Germans for efficiency, can we?

      Delete
  5. Yeah, thats very true.
    As a german person, I would never ask a salesman "whats good to buy" though, guess I'm a stereotypical german in this scenario. :D

    ReplyDelete
  6. As a german I can only confirm this and add that this is one of the reasons for me to think about moving to another country. I hate it. People in general are lacking friendliness. All that might be more efficient than it is in other countries, but I hate it, because friendly people just make me happy, unfriendly people don't.

    ReplyDelete
  7. As a german, this is how I experience it http://i.imgur.com/fLlpihT.png?1

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well.. As a Dane, I'm confused as to how you'd expect him to react. Obviously all his products are good to buy today. What products are especially good for you is something only you know.
    I'd genuinely love to know, I know I'm so used to this kind of costumer interaction that I can't even imagine how you'd do it differently.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe you've never traveled in the USA ... generally, at least where I'm from, there's a more casual, friendly rapport between vendor and buyer. It's not strange to ask what's good to buy, since some veggies might be a little late in the season, and others might be a bit early. Friendliness is not bad!

      Delete
  9. Funny that the salesman actually looks turkish :D
    My experience in Germany was much better, I guess asking narrowed down specific questions would as I did would be better to the "typical german" salesman, but I actually thought that sales people (and germans) were helpful, maybe they won't throw themselves at you once you enter the store but they're helpful in a different way :D

    ReplyDelete
  10. Well... Germans will be Germans... I've been around German people for a long period of time almost daily (I attended a German school in the Canary Islands) and I've been in Germany several times (as an exchange student and as a tourist), and this is the usual. I actually am a little German myself when entering a shop and just don't expect them to be so friendly, and perhaps store clerks in the USA would make me a bit uncomfortable (they're quite friendly in Spain and they sometimes unnerve me). But I understand it's their job and they have to do that: I would be even more displeased if they didn't do it. Aside from my personal idiosincracies I find their attitude not at all bad, but something that should be encouraged. Friendliness is something everyone who is public-oriented must have.

    I hope I made some sense XD

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I actually am a little German myself when entering a GERMAN shop and just don't expect them to be so friendly".

      It was a bit confusing.

      Delete
    2. My girlfriend, who is Italian, just got a job working as a clerk at a department store here in Berlin. Customers will go three floors out of their way to check out at her register. She says it's because she's the only friendly Verkäuferin...

      Delete