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Sunday, November 22, 2015

Ameribird

A turkey goes by many names all over the world, but it is not from any of those places.


25 comments:

  1. "Imperialist! Cultural invader! Take your traditions back and leave ours alone! Ami go home!"

    SCNR. Of course that is not my personal opinion. But well, Halloween is not that long gone and phrases of that kind were heard here, again.

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  2. Hilarious! But there is mistake in Hindi word for 'Peru'. Consonant र is an exception, For it Diacritic mark ू does not go below as for other consonants which looks like कू, तू but in middle of letter र, and it looks like रू, It should look like 'पीरू'. Other than that it's great.

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  3. It has a relative in South America. http://www.raywilsonbirdphotography.co.uk/Galleries/Birds/non-passerines/Meleagrididae/Ocellated_Turkey.html

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    Replies
    1. WOAH that bird is crazy-looking! Like a peacock and a turkey made beautiful, beautiful babies.

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    2. Man, this thing lives in the Yucatan. That's still North America :-) (Yeah, more "Central-American"-ish, but that's still technically North)

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  4. I'm pretty sure ديك رومي means "Roman rooster/chicken" not Greek

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    Replies
    1. Wikipedia has an explanation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_names_for_turkeys#Other_places

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  5. Actually the Arabic "Rumi" was used to refer to the Byzantine Empire (as in the Eastern Roman Empire), and subsequently to the Anatolia and Balkan region. For exemple "Greek Orthodox" in Arabic is "Rum Orthodox"

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  6. There is a fun thing in Maori language due to this coincidence in the English that "Turkey" and "turkey" sound the same. The word for turkey is "korukoru", so they just transferred it to the country name due to the confusion. The "normal" name co-exists ("Tākei"), but I could not depend it in Maori wiki. Wow! Hopefully, someone else did it! https://mi.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C4%81kei

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  7. In Chinese, 火鸡 Huǒ jī, aka Fire Chicken. Even China sees it as another type of chicken. XD

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  8. In Finnish language Turkey (country) and a fur coat are the same: "turkki." This happened to my husband's relative: His wife's dress was complimented in English, and he wanted to return it, saying something nice about the other person's wife's coat, and ended up saying "Nice turkey".

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  9. In Nahuatl, the original old language spoken in Mexico, it is "Huexolotl".
    From the Nahuatl words "Old" and "Xolotl", a mexica deity.
    Because its face looks like an old bird.
    And nowadays, just Guajolote.

    And yes, it is from Mexico too.

    :)

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  10. Haha, my friends are from Burma and speak a language called "Chin" (yes I'm serious) that I am currently learning. Their word for Turkey is "vui ar" which means "elephant chicken" lol

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  11. BS"D

    In Spanish, we call him Pavo, Paa-vo. The word "turkey" (readen: toor-kee) in Spanish means "deep blue" :D

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  12. In Portuguese the bird is called Peru as well!
    In Dutch, it's called kalkoen (i.e. bird from Calicut, an important harbour town in India)

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  13. About the Greek one:

    Galopoula

    Galo (from the italian galo d' India)+ poula (the word for bird, slightly changed to form the noun).

    French would be Gallo (with a double l). It's a common mistake.

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  14. In Japanese: 七面鳥 shichi-men-chō or seven-face-bird.

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    Replies
    1. Same goes for Korean.
      It's called : '칠면조[chil myeon-jo]'.

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  15. This is delightful! In Hebrew, the word for turkey is "hodu" (הודו) which is the same word used for India.

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  16. Funny. In Russian, it is "индейка" (= "native american's [bird]"). The only correct version of all languages ^_^

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