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Sunday, July 14, 2019

Vertical Signal

Traffic lights on the far side of the intersection is the only right way. In Europe I smash my face against the windshield to see the color of the light, or worse, look at the light out of the side window, and potentially miss anything happening in the intersection or crosswalk! Arrrggh
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...and we'll move every stoplight!


14 comments:

  1. I've heard the argument that putting the lights on the near side prevents people from going too far ahead (and blocking the crosswalk), since the light is no longer visible when you inch too far ahead.

    In the US, I also often find it less intuitive to know which light corresponds to which lane.

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    1. Crosswalks in the US? Maybe in the largest cities ...

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    2. Apparently, US intersections tend to be designed only with cars in mind, with little regard for cyclists or pedestrians.

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    3. In North America, cyclists and pedestrians are the enemy.

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  2. Huh, I never noticed this difference. Come to think of it, I like the non-US way better.

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  3. In France, they put these little traffic lights (https://www.google.com/maps/@47.2122482,-1.5793739,3a,18.4y,162.28h,83.05t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s2EuOXUE-FRo0BpGCBjON0Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656) in the first driver's (or cyclist's) visual field in almost all regular traffic lights crossings.

    I went in England last month and I noticed they don't have them, but they (sometimes) have a second, US-style traffic lights set after the intersection.

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  4. In London the low level mini traffic lights are used for cyclists. Especially useful when they allow them to start ahead of the motor vehicles.

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  5. Which countries have silly system like that? Here in Finland the lights are on both sides and usually on straight poles, example https://img.ilcdn.fi/IML4GFEev3D4yJhgYriNJj7Pd00=/full-fit-in/2048x/img-s3.ilcdn.fi/4998a00afbc58845cfbc4c0e92419bf4cb0d04717213b28e72fad3f183b1617a.jpg

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    Replies
    1. This is in Germany - yeah, they have those too, so that if you are in the front of the line and can't see the one above you, you can look to your left and see the one there. Which comes with its own set of problems - what if someone runs a red light, or a pedestrian crosses on red? You won't see it because you're looking sharply to the left instead of straight ahead! Foolish, I say!!

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  6. Iceland does that, too - that was the first time I saw it and I found it so scary. They drive so far into the crossing before they stop! It almost seems like they're going to run over it. And yes, there would usually be a pedestrian crossing, too.
    They must have picked that up from the Americans. That's what you get from having foreign armies in your country...

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  7. "LIGHT YEARS ahead". Haha is that a pun?

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  8. In Japan they just have them on both sides of the intersection if it is big enough

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